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Notices

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Typography

Notices. During a voyage charter various notices may be required to be given by the shipowner (or the master, on his behalf) to the charterer.

A "notice of readiness to load date" and a "notice of arrival" are two examples of notices in addition to the usual "Notice of Readiness". While the first may be similar in name to the last, it is more relevant to the date of earliest loading (and, therefore to the "laydays and cancelling clause") than the description of the vessel's physical readiness, which relates to the Notice of Readiness.

Notices. During a voyage charter various notices may be required to be given by the shipowner (or the master, on his behalf] to the charterer. A "notice of readiness to load date" and a "notice of arrival" are two examples of notices in addition re the usual "Notice of Readiness". While the first may be similar in name to the last, it is more relevant to the date of earliest loading (and, therefore to the "laydays and cancelling clause") than the description of the vessel's physical and legal readiness which relate to the Notice of Readiness. An example of the first two notices can be found in MULTIFORM:

"The Owners shall give ... days' approximate and . . . days' definite notice of the vessel's readiness to load date and shall confirm her ETA at the first loading port 48 and 24 hours in advance, to . . . Upon the vessel's sailing from the last loading port, the Master shall radio to . . . giving the sailing time, the quantity of cargo loaded and the vessel's ETA at the first or sole discharging port and shall thereafter radio . . . hours' and . .. hours' notice of her ETA to . . ."

("ETA" is "Estimated time of arrival".) These notices are Notices of Arrival and not actually Notices of Readiness.

The effect of a Notice of Readiness may cause problems with the counting of laytime and is discussed in more detail.

 

 

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